Gamification Analysis: How Snapchat Launched Spectacles

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This article is written by Contributing Writer Erik van Mechelen along with Yu-kai Chou.

Making moves

Snap Inc. is making moves.

First, it built a cool mobile-only camera and messaging app with millions of engaged users. Snaps are ephemeral and the app opens on the camera.

The founders famously turned down a $3-billion offer from Facebook.

Snap Inc. continued improving the Snapchat product and attracting new users, rising to the most-used teen app in 2016 and making big dents in the over-35 age demo, too. They want to change the way we think about cameras and storytelling.

What’s next for them?

The short answer is Spectacles, a pair of Snapchat glasses, a foray into territory where Google Glass seemed to fail and where others like Vue aren’t quite making it yet.

In this article, I’ll use Octalysis glasses to investigate the Spectacles launch and speculate on Snap Inc.’s future plans for augmented reality.

Continue reading Gamification Analysis: How Snapchat Launched Spectacles

Why Commissions Hurt Productivity and Job Satisfaction

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This article was written by Contributing Writer Erik van Mechelen

The Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Goes to…

Contract theory is evolving. This year’s Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences went to Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmström for their contributions to contract theory.

In the 1970s, Holmström’s informativeness principle helped define how a contract should link an agent’s pay to performance-relevant information. In the 1980s, Hart made contributions to a branch of contract theory known as incomplete contracts.

Together, their body of work helped us better understand multi-taskingmoral hazard, and simply put, how to best design contracts for desired outcomes. Multi-tasking tackles the problem of short- vs long-term thinking, while moral hazard refers to actions taken that do not serve the benefit of the contract (but that the contract does not deter).

Sound familiar? Octalysis is all about understanding human motivation to best drive desired actions.

In discussions with Yu-kai and through videos he’s shared on Octalysis Prime, I’ve learned and come to share the opinion that we are very early in the quest to understand human motivation and apply this understanding to our lives and work.

New research is starting to suggest commission-based compensation frameworks actually reduce productivity and job satisfaction, especially in the long run.

In this article, we’ll examine these new findings from an Octalysis perspective. So get your Octalysis Glasses ready! Continue reading Why Commissions Hurt Productivity and Job Satisfaction

Trump vs Clinton: How Donald’s Charisma and Emotion Stacked Up Against Hillary’s

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This article was written by Contributing Writer Erik van Mechelen with Yu-kai’s video commentary of the first 2016 presidential debate as source material. 

How did Trump win?

A lot of people are trying to figure out how Donald Trump got enough votes in the right places to win the 2016 American presidential election.

In this article, we’re not going to focus on pollsecho chambers, reactions, or even what each candidate said leading up to the election.

In the lowest voter turnout for a U.S. presidential election in 20 years, it’s clear from results that Democrats didn’t show up to vote like they did for Obama, that 3rd-party candidates mattered, and that Trump despite inflammatory rhetoric somehow found an edge.

These are all notable topics. But I’m going to sideline them for now.

Instead, we’re going to focus on HOW things were said.

While logic and argument are crucial for decision-making, charisma and emotion and persuasion are influences on that same decision-making process. We’re humans–our brains depend on logic and emotion.

I’ll use the first presidential debate for source material as we dig in.

As always, I’ll sprinkle in mentions of the Octalysis Core Drives to spice things up.

Continue reading Trump vs Clinton: How Donald’s Charisma and Emotion Stacked Up Against Hillary’s

Gamifying Kickstarter: Bears vs Babies Case Study

 

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This post was written by Contributing Writer Erik van Mechelen after Octalysis community member, Ivan Lee, notified Yu-kai about the story.

An over-performing Kickstarter campaign

What is Bears vs Babies? It’s a game. It was created by the same people who made Exploding Kittens: Elan Lee (XBox, ARGs) and Matthew Inman (The Oatmeal). The game takes a few minutes to learn, it’s kid-friendly, and each round takes about 20 minutes to play.

Elan and Matthew absolutely crushed their goal of raising $10,000 (they’ve raised over $2.3 million from over 61,000 backers).

This is usually the moment when Kickstarter owners add new stuff to their campaigns, sometimes pulling the focus away from what backers cared about at the beginning–funding the campaign of a capable team to get a product or service.

But Elan and Matthew decided to do something different.

They sent an email to all backers after quickly surpassing their goal by 10,000%.

The subject line read: STOP GIVING US YOUR MONEY. (More on this later.)

In this article, I’ll break down this successfully backed campaign (still with 9 days to go!) from the time they sent an email asking people to stop giving them money. (Spoiler: people kept giving them money.)

As always, we’ll look at this case study from the Octalysis perspective with a baseline understanding of the 8 Core Drives of human motivation.

Continue reading Gamifying Kickstarter: Bears vs Babies Case Study

Why We Procrastinate On Simple Things

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This article was written by Erik van Mechelen. Content is based on a video on OctalysisPrime.com from Yu-kai Chou. 

Our Friend, Procrastination

We’ve all been there. You need to write an important email to a friend, client or investor. But you do other things instead.

Even if that email is simple or short, you might defer it and make progress on other tasks. You probably procrastinate because that email is important.

How could something so simple as an email throw us off? Let’s look at why you might be procrastinating on important things, even if they should be simple.

Continue reading Why We Procrastinate On Simple Things