Adventures @ FITology | #4 – Get Fit February | Alternate Reality Game

This post is contributed by Saamir Gupta of FITology.

In most of the metropolitan cities, we have people from different cities, states and countries come and work. They all mostly settle in high rise societies but seldom get a chance to develop a strong sense of community. Different families living in the same high-rise apartments, might recognize each other and say hi! whenever they bump into each other, but that is mostly it. Every family has it’s own daily schedule and people mostly have a social circle from work or relations – there are very few avenues to make friends with your neighborhood.

This is exactly what we wanted to address – We wanted to bring these families closer. We wanted to help them on their health and wellness journey as well. And by the families of a residential society we mean over 500 apartments, all age groups (from new born to 80+ young men and women), all kinds of work profiles, all cultures and races. It is a massive mix of participants. How to solve for it, all at the same time?

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Interactive Learning Content at Professor Game

This blog post is contributed by Rob Alvarez, creator of Professor Game.

During my work at IE Business School Publishing, we regularly create interactive learning content. We have our own processes and ways of doing things, but today I want to talk about ways I’ve used of Octalysis to improve my designs. First, let me clarify that when I say design I’m specifically referring to learning experience design and gamification design.

As with any project, we have an ideation phase, where we come up with ideas on what to do and how to take the learning experience and results to the next level. During this phase, I’ve seen a significant improvement since I’ve been studying Octalysis and drawing from its ideas for projects. I’m not changing the whole internal process that we follow in our department, but rather using many of the things I’ve learned. As you might know, the Octalysis Strategy Dashboard offers five critical elements:

  1. Business Metrics, leading to Game Objectives
  2. Users, leading to Players
  3. Desired actions, leading to Win-States
  4. Feedback Mechanics, leading to Triggers
  5. Incentives, leading to Rewards

If you want more information on these, go to Yu-kai’s post on this topic, or, if you want to go deeper, read Actionable Gamification by the same author.

After completing the dashboard mentioned above for a project, Octalysis moves into the ideation phase. This is where the 8 core drives come in especially handy, and where I’ve found a lot of value in coming up with new ideas and balancing out the different motivations for our students. Often, you will see that towards the end of any regular ideation phase for the creation of a learning experience, even if you don’t follow the previous process it can be very useful to analyze your conclusions using the Octalysis lens, to figure out what core drives your idea is tapping more into. You might also want to reflect upon whether you also want to include other drives you might want to reinforce. It’s also useful to even take a step back and, if you haven’t taken a look at your user with the dashboard, to think about that person now, what are the main motivational drives present in this type of person and if you are using elements that tap into those main drives.

The more I use loose ideas from Octalysis, the more I realize how well they tie in together and how useful it can be to go through all the steps and phases. My daily work and discoveries in gamification have led me to get to know world-leading gamification gurus like Yu-kai Chou and other experts from around the world. All that I’ve learned and found useful led me on a journey to look for the best way to share my regular discoveries and applications of gamification in education with others. That’s how I’ve arrived to a new project, the creation of the Professor Game Podcast where I interview experts and practitioners to inspire teachers and professors to make their jobs even more amazing! If you want more information, look for it on iTunes or Stitcher, or go to professorgame.com.

Rob Alvarez Bucholska

@RobAlvarezB

This blog post is contributed by Rob Alvarez, creator of Professor Game.

Adventures @ FITology | #3 – Fit Team Challenge | Alternate Reality Game

This post was written by Saamir Gupta.

The topmost concern of multinational consulting organizations these days is keeping the employees happy. How to keep a track of employee engagement when teams are spread across the world? How to make sure that employees know other team mates when they are constantly traveling for work or are on another project site? How to root in the sense of work life balance and healthy living with crazy 12-14 hours of work every day?

We designed Fit Team Challenge to attempt an answer to all these questions. We invited participations from a global team of about 150 consulting professionals – part of the same company. These professionals were spread across the world, from remotest towns of south India to biggest metropolitan cities (New York, Sydney) – pretty much across all time zones.

The goal of the competition, besides the coveted title of the fittest team, was for everyone to get into the lifestyle of fitness.

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Overcome Your Cognitive Biases: Expert Analysis of ‘Super Forecasting’

Read and written by Erik van Mechelen

Wake up to your cognitive biases and you will see more

There are many ways to learn about your cognitive biases. You might start by reading Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow, or the scientific paper he wrote in 1974 with his friend and colleague Amos Tversky, Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases’, where the pair shared their observations and experiments across a number of biases humans all share.

Judgment under uncertainty.

You could also notice these biases in action.

Humans are goal-oriented. We develop an aim. In Octalysis speak, this is our Core Drive 2: Development & Accomplishment putting a fire under us, sparking us into motion. (Other Core Drives of Octalysis will play into our emotions, too, of course.)

But our belief in how successful we will be in achieving our goal comes  down to a matter of prediction under uncertainty. Here enter several key biases, among them recency bias, overconfidence, and what Philip E. Tetlock calls ‘tip of the nose thinking.’

Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner have written about a unique way to practice getting over our cognitive biases in prediction, through Super Forecasting. In their story about a small group of super forecasters who defeated IARPAs own government-backed researchers in an extended game of geopolitical forecasting, the authors provide an architect’s blueprint for starting one’s own journey of forecasting. Because life is full of prediction. And wouldn’t it be better if you could improve your ability to do so?

As Kahneman said, what you see is all there is.

Wake up. Try to see more.

Here’s a bonus cognitive bias. (Many more to follow as we go through the book, Super Forecasting.)

Your eyes follow the symbols in this sentence. You can’t help making meaning out of them. Why are you trying to make meaning out of them? This sentence is just a pattern of symbols.

Step back even more. What are you bringing to this reading. Why are you so eager for answers?

Stay tuned for chapter by chapter analysis of ‘Super Forecasting’ by Philip E Tetlock and Gardner.

This and other expert analysis on the top research in psychology and behavior can be found at OctalysisPrime.com

Laurel & Wolf — Product Friction

This post is by Ali Shadle. Product Friction is any obstacle that prevents a user from getting real, tangible value from a product. Learn the secrets to building the path of least resistance from popular web applications!

Understanding where products make me feel uncomfortable

Ali Shadle has created a way to teardown the user experience and offer solutions. Using a human-focused design mindset, Ali reacted and created actionable solutions to Laurel and Wolf’s homepage, funnel, and checkout.

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