Exploration of Knowledge

This article was written by Bo, Octalysis Prime member: Bo Paivinen Ullersted is a Danish teacher in physics and math at high school level. He has been working with gamifying education since 2015 and runs a primarily Danish language blog and Facebook group about this. This article first appeared on Bo’s website

An approach to gamifying the classroom

An approach to gamifying classroom book-and-paper teaching, which worked well when tested in practice.

Note: My references here are to the Octalysis framework for gamification.

So, after having messed around with various approaches to gamifying teaching, I realised that I needed something simple and flexible. Something that could be used no matter what the topic was, and something that could be finished in a reasonable timeframe. At the same time, I found that a key issue was to provide students having different levels of skills with enough challenges, while avoiding the typical motivational killer of “I didn’t manage to solve all of the challenges”, and also making sure everyone practice the same skills.

My solution to these needs was the exploration of knowledge concept that I present here.

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8 Education Gamification Examples for Learning Sprints

This article was written by Erik van Mechelen, based on the concepts in the Octalysis Gamification framework created by Yu-kai Chou. 

Why Learning Sprints are Useful

Lifelong learning is a marathon, but sprints can be useful along the way. Sprints can shock your body and mind. They will drive you through Core Drive 2: Accomplishment & Development, and several other Core Drives (depending on your sprint’s design).

Depending on where you are in developing a skill, trade, or craft, you can benefit from a sprint in the following ways:

  • improving your habits
  • leveling up to a more focused work ethic
  • learning new things about your daily routine and rhythms
  • actually learning the mini-skill, trade, or craft (obvious, but must include!)
  • exploring something completely new, just for fun!

Learning sprints are fast-paced, focused, and give you time to reflect more frequently than a long-term goal.

Bite, chew, then see how it feels.

Because of how efficiently sprints use your time, they are a great way to test an approach and see how something fits into your routine without having to dedicate years.

How to choose what to do is a completely different matter. (Which I may or may not be able to help with, but definitely ping me in the comments, because I might be able to!)

I’ll sprinkle in some Gamification Techniques and as always base my Top 8 Learning Sprints on the 8 Core Drives of Octalysis.

Let’s do this.

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Top 10 Education Gamification Examples for Lifelong Learners

These gamification examples were tested by Erik van Mechelen, based on the gamification framework–Octalysis–created by Yu-kai Chou.

Education Gamification Examples for Lifelong Learning

Each of us learn every day, even if we aren’t trying to. As humans, we pick up new ideas through mimicry and even by osmosis. Well, maybe not exactly by osmosis, but it sure feels that way!

Here are 10 gamification examples from education for lifelong learners. Be sure to tell me what I missed in the comments 🙂

As before, I’ve included the ever-powerful Game Techniques along the way.

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5 Books that Welcomed me to Games and Gamification

This post was written by Contributing Writer Erik van Mechelen

The value of reading

With non-fiction, I usually read quickly (scan), apply what I’ve learned, then come back later as needed to refresh. I prefer to learn by doing. This is the case for my education in gamification, too (I built an iPhone app instead of reading too much about it.)

For me, books are just a great way to see how others have done it and test against your own approach.

I borrowed my brother’s copy of The Lord of the Rings from his bookshelf. I was nine years old. Ever since, reading has been my favorite way to consume content. With a book in hand or on screen, I can read as fast or as slow as I want, mark the pages, save comments for later, and return to the book when needed. (I still think reading is one of the biggest level-ups any parent can give their child. And I believe that many of us can improve our reading ability and critical thinking well into adulthood.)

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Five Educational Games You Wish You Played In School

Bored students in a classroom

Written by Christine Yee

Learning should be fun. However, this is not the experience of most kids in conventional schooling systems. Reading and math can be frustrating for a child who does not understand the underlying concepts or the larger picture of what they are learning. In many cases, students are structurally encouraged to just rote memorize information and simply go through the motions by following the school curriculum. Without establishing the right building blocks and foundations for comprehension and critical thinking, school can become even more daunting as courses become harder as the student rises through the grade levels.

However, by integrating imagination, creativity and game mechanics with the desired information, knowledge can come to life in meaningful ways. Compared to traditional grading systems, this offers a far more effective way to inspire the core drives of Core Drive #2, Accomplishment & Development as well as Core Drive #3, Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback.

Immersive game environments can incorporate visual, auditory, and tactile modes of exchanging information with players, which creates an interactive learning environment where engagement is key to success.

The rewards gained from feeling an internal sense of real achievement and having the ability to creatively solve and master challenges becomes far more meaningful in this type of learning environment.

And with games, it is also possible to effectively utilize other forms of motivation such as Core Drive #4, Ownership & Possession and Core Drive #5, Social Influence & Relatedness to further enhance the experience of players and add a greater sense of personal meaning and significance to what they are learning.

Here are five examples of educational games that are transforming the way kids are now learning in school.

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