Gamification Analysis of Audible: Octalysis Level 2, Scaffolding Phase

This post was written by contributing writer Erik van Mechelen based on the Octalysis framework designed by Yu-kai Chou.

Entering the Audible Scaffolding phase

Getting beyond Discovery and Onboarding is impressive. But products and experiences really need to shine during the Scaffolding phase if they want to get Players to the Endgame.

Scaffolding starts once a player has learned the basic tools and rules to play the game and has achieved the “First Major Win-State.”

Yu-kai wrote about Scaffolding over here, but this is the key piece:

Regarding the scaffolding phase, one thing to note is that more often than not, it requires the exact same (or very similar) actions on a regular/daily basis, and the Gamification designer must answer the question, “why would my users come back over and over again for the same actions?”

Once you understand the intrinsic and extrinsic trigger/action/reward loops, you can deliver them via the experience.

Keep note that usually extrinsic rewards are better at attracting people to participate in the first place (Discovery and Onboarding), but towards the Scaffolding and EndGame, you want to transition to intrinsic motivation as much as possible.

Continue reading Gamification Analysis of Audible: Octalysis Level 2, Scaffolding Phase

10 Collection Experiences We Can’t Live Without

This post was written by contributing writer Erik van Mechelen.

Collect till you can’t anymore

There’s something about collecting things that is an essential part of the human experience.

It’s in our nature.

We organized in groups to hunt and gather. Okay, we needed to survive.

But now we continue to collect.

Sure, there’s a counter-movement (minimalism), but even minimalists are in the business of collecting, often collecting experiences or relationships or something else they consider more valuable than material goods.

We collect stamps, rocks, feathers, books, ideas, friends, relationships, experiences. There’s something about it that we can’t avoid. Collecting can be about ownership and possession, or wealth and status, but however defined, you know it when you see it.

There’s a downside to collecting too much (perhaps). We all laugh or shake our heads when we see true hoarders in action, or people trampling one another on Black Friday. This could be some deranged form of the collecting mindset gone astray.

But it’s hard to make a case against the value of collections, whether inherent to themselves or to produce time savings or personalization.

Collections can be added to experiences, like my biology teacher in high school who had us collect 20 insects during our insect study (yes, it felt like Pokemon in real life). I get the same feeling as I collect knowledge and ideas from lectures and edutainment on YouTube.

When you interview for a job, the hiring manager will ask you for a collection of your experiences to discover if you have the skills and mindset to do the job and fit the culture of their company.

At bottom, life is a collection of experiences. Our past and present and future experiences coalesce to make a life. Collections matter.

Continue reading 10 Collection Experiences We Can’t Live Without

Top Ten Learning Games For Kids

Top 10 Learning Games for Kids by Yu Kai Chou

Top 10 Learning Games for Kids

(If you are confused about what all the Core Drive #s are about in this post, make sure you check out the Gamification Framework: Octalysis first!)

This is a follow-up to last week’s post on What are Learning Games. One of the most promising applications of gamification is to enhance the learning experiences of children. The teaching tools of today are no longer limited to chalkboards, whiteboards, flashcards, textbooks and worksheets. Games offer kids more interactive options.

“There is no commandment which says, thou shall not have fun,” says one YouTuber who discussed the use of games for educational purposes. They can enrich a child’s understanding of information rather effortlessly. And with games, learning feels effortless, as opposed to being an aggravating chore.

But be forewarned. It is important to choose your educational game wisely. Just because it is packaged as a learning tool, does not automatically justify its worth. David Kleeman President of the American Center for Children and Media sums this up well as he says:

“I love and support the idea of tapping the engagement and strategic thinking of game play, but I’ve also seen very poor examples that are little more than gussied-up rote learning,”

With that said, here is my list of Top Ten Learning Games for Kids. They range from the teaching of simple and intermediate academics to more complex real life skills.

Learning Game #1: Dragon Box

Why wait until middle school to start learning Algebra? While some students excel in this subject, it is certainly not everyone’s favorite. Many kids learn to solve equations very mechanically without really understanding the underlying concepts at work.

In Dragon Box visual elements are used to represent the idea of balancing two sides within a closed system. The goal is to eliminate all unnecessary elements to get the box all by itself. The game progresses to higher levels which more closely approximates the types of equations that kids will eventually face in school.

I remember for my childhood (yes, even as an Asian kid), I hated math. It was the most annoying and boring subject. It was the epitome of “school work,” and it was what many parents cared about the most. I also know A LOT of other kids thought like me too.

The amazing thing about Dragon Box is that little kids LOVE to play it without knowing that they are solving complex math. There has been many case studies where 4+ year olds are mastering and solving thousands of middle school Algebra problems!

This is the epitome of a learning game – making something boring fun and exciting!

Learning Game #2: Mind Snacks

Mind Snacks is an interactive app that teaches words and phrases in different languages such as Spanish, Chinese, French, German and Japanese. There is also the option to choose SAT vocabulary. Instead of learning through rote memorization and repetition, fun touch screen games are used.

Most kids don’t like being confined to a desk with a textbook. But with Mind Snacks, they can learn foreign words and phrases in informal settings, such as waiting in line, or even during a long car trip.

Childhood is the best time to learn new languages. The earlier this is done, the better. With games like Mind Snacks, kids can optimize this valuable window of opportunity instead of waiting until middle school or even high school.

By the way, I must add that I have been playing this game for a while to learn Spanish myself, and it is by far the most fun learning experience I have had towards Spanish (comparable to playing Diablo III in Spanish).

The difference to this and Duolingo, is that Duolingo gamifies the Meta-game towards language learning, where Mind Snacks make the learning part itself fun!

Learning Game #3: DIY.org

Projects like baking a cake, knitting a scarf, planting a garden or even making toys can give kids an immense sense of Development & Accomplishment (Core Drive#2) and Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback. They also learn that not everything of value needs to be store bought, especially when they can use their own abilities to create these things.

Do it yourself projects teach problem solving skills, artistic sensibilities, resourcefulness and independence. They also help bring out the creativity that is inherent in all of us.

The site, DIY.org has an app called DIY – Get Skills, Be Awesome. Kids can showcase their creations and even share them in a larger community. This social aspect allows them to receive validation from peers their own age, not just from mom and dad (Core Drives #3 and #5)

Learning Game #4: Code Spells

More parents are realizing how important it is for kids to learn how to code, especially since this is a highly marketable skill. However, programming is not offered as a core subject in school for small children yet. But with a game like Code Spells, writing code becomes a fun pastime, not an extra learning course.

Players must help gnome characters perform certain tasks by using magic. But the spells  they use need to be written in Java code.

A study on 40 girls (ages 10-12), showed that learning code was actually quite effortless due to this game. And some of the subjects even expressed disappointment that the game was over too soon. A highly addictive experience combined with immense learning equates to a fabulous learning game indeed!

I remember when I took my first computer class in Visual Basic, it was so boring and dull that I gave up on it quickly for the exciting topic of Economics (that eventually disappointed me), which led to a great regret for me because now being a professional in the tech world, I truly wished I learned more programming when I was younger. Hopefully this can prevent other kids from having the same regret later (and who knows, maybe it’s not too late for me!)

Learning Game #5: Scribble Naughts

Scribble Naughts is a media creation game for kids around ages 8-11 which teaches creative problem solving skills through imaginative scenarios that involve logic, spelling and creativity.

Players are given a particular challenge to solve. And they can do this by summoning just about anything they can think of,  by typing it into a field.

Imaginations can run wild with all the different possibilities that can be brought to life. Players can even create new puzzles that can be shared with others (Core Drive #3 Empowerment of Creativity and Feedback).

If the super hero Green Lantern had played this game growing up, he would have eliminated his biggest weakness – lack of spontaneous creativity.

Learning Game #6 Dora’s Cooking Club

Dora’s Cooking Club is for ages 4-6. Most younger kids love Dora. So using this character to inspire learning in children is already a huge plus.

Kids learn about numbers, fractions, shapes and Spanish as they help Dora and her grandmother prepare a delicious Mexican meal.

Children are likely to play this game voluntarily as opposed to doing exercises in a workbook.

Unfortunately, this is a bit out of my league…I haven’t found the strength in me to master this game and be addictively edutained for months.

Learning Game #7. Game Star Mechanic

An important life skill (which is difficult to teach) is to come up with a good, creative idea and develop it through a process of logical steps.

With Game Star Mechanic, kids are given the opportunity to hone this ability by making their own games and sharing them with others. According to their site, their community has over 250,000 designers whose games have been played over 5 million times. Game Star Mechanic is even being used by teachers in classroom settings to fulfill STEM requirements.

If I had played this game on game design growing up, I would have become an even stronger Gamification Expert (assuming that this is physically possible).

Learning Game #8: SimCity

SimCity is one of the original awesome Learning/Productive/Serious Games in the industry that really got the hearts and minds of players. Eventually, you learn that it also gets the brains of players.

The makers of SimCity have come out with educational version (Sim City EDU) to fulfill classroom STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) requirements. Kids are asked to build virtual cities as they learn about socio-economic development, urban planning and environmental management.

This holistic framework helps kids develop big picture thinking styles where they learn how specific actions affect a larger system such as an entire city.

I wasn’t a big fan of this game when I was younger (it’s because I messed up the water piping and sewage system in my city the first time playing and gave up), but one of my best friends who loved this game ended up being an Architect – graduating from Architecture Association, one of the top architectural universities in the world.

Learning Game #9: Mindblown Life

Teaching money management skills often takes the form of stern lecturing between parents and their young adult children.

Mindblown Life is a game that is designed to teach money management skills to teens. Multiple players participate and interact with one another as they try to balance their professional and personal lives to avoid overspending (Core Drive #8: Loss and Avoidance).

Cofounder, Tracy Moore spoke to Mashable and said, “We’re at an unsustainable point in financial literacy…If we don’t do something now, the tomorrow that exists will be dramatically different from the one we imagined and the one we want.”

Albeit, money management is particularly critical in today’s economy. However, it is something that is best learned through the feel of managing your own money (Core Drive #4: Ownership & Possession). Mindblown Life is therefore a wonderful tool to help impart these life lessons.

Learning Game #10: The Misadventures of PB Winterbottom

The Misadventures of PB Winterbottom is a challenging puzzle game for Windows PC and XBox Live Arcade.

Perhaps the most striking characteristic is the look and feel of the game, which is done in stunning black and white graphics. According to Destructoid.com, “All of the art is downright beautiful to look at…there’s a simple elegance to every detail in the levels and story frames that draws you in.”

The player moves through the game as a pie stealing character named PB Winterbottom. The player’s strategies can involve cloning him or even manipulating time.

Critical thinking and problem solving skills can indeed be cultivated effortlessly through imaginative and immersive digital activities such as Misadventures. This is like the kid version of “Portal,” where an understanding of physics (and the fun places where you can break the laws of physics!) become engaging and critical to solving the problems.

Conclusion on Learning Games

Most people think of games as being strictly recreational. But this does not necessarily have to be the case. Games can help kids of all ages master learning feats without the struggle and frustration that is often felt in formal learning contexts. When designed properly, they can boost feelings of confidence, accomplishment (Core Drive #2) and self efficacy. They offer excellent opportunities for players to tap into enormous reserves of creativity and problem solving abilities. And best of all, they can be incredibly enjoyable.

(Thanks to Christine Yee for tremendously helping me on this post)

Gamification in Education: Top 10 Gamification Case Studies that will Change our Future

Education Gamification

New to Gamification? Check out my post What is Gamification & my Gamification Framework: Octalysis

Education Gamification in Action

There’s a lot of potential in the field of Education Gamification. I believe that humans have an innate Desire to learn. However, much of the school system these days “gets in the way of our education.”

If you ask children, “What is work?” They will say, “School and homework!!” But if you ask them, “What is play?” Many of them will say, “Video/games!!”

Clearly there should be a way to help kids learn from what they do best – play. This is why many educators are looking into a variety of new tools and techniques in Education Gamification.

No longer viewed as a mundane process for presenting information while testing for retention and understanding, the modern educational challenge involves tasks of engaging students, stimulating their interests, retaining their attention, and maintaining a positive attitude in a nurturing environment.

Key to these goals is the effort to maintain a rich communications environment that encourages feedback and reinforcement, not only between the instructor/teacher and students, but also between the students themselves.  These socially interactive mechanisms, with the proper level of control for encouragement and discipline, can be designed in effective ways to create “fun” learning situations.  The following examples reveal a number of ingenious approaches for not only improving the learning process, but also producing more effective educational environments.

Education Gamification Example #1 – DuoLingo:Learn a language while translating the Web

Duolingo is a massive online collaboration which combines a free language-learning website with a paid crowdsourced text translation platform. The service is designed so that students can learn a given language online, while helping to translate websites and documents. Beginners start out with basic, simple sentences from the web, while advanced users receive more complex sentences. As one progresses, so does the complexity of the sentences they are asked to translate.

In each case Duolingo provides the learning and translation tools to help the student to properly understand and memorize the words that they encounter. Each student can also vote on the quality of the other students’ translations, providing valuable feedback for comprehension and learning. The top rated translations for each sentence are made available for public viewing and collection.

As students learn a language, they earn skill points when lessons are completed or web content is translated. Lessons associated with a skill are successively completed when a give number of translations are completed. Since web content is inherently more interesting than “made up” sentences, the translation assignments are more engaging.

The site also includes time-based elements, such as skill points and time bonuses when questions are answered correctly within a given time limit. Incorrect answers result in a loss of points and “lives”, as well as the delay of leveling up. Since the system is adaptive, it tracks each completed lesson, translation, test, and practice session to provide feedback to the student and plan future lessons and translation assignments to better address their needs. All this adds up to a great Education Gamification experience.

 

Education Gamification Example #2 – Ribbon Hero: Epic game that teaches you how to use Microsoft Office

Ribbon Hero is an add-in game, available as a free Microsoft download, to help educate users of Office 2007 and 2010 on how to use the tools available in the new ribbon interface. Wow, what a creative use of Education Gamification!

Once installed, the game can easily be initiated from any of the key Office programs, such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Once in the game, the user (player) is presented with challenges which can yield points if completed.

The challenges are grouped into four sections: text manipulation, page design and layout, artistic presentation, and a more generalized quick points section. With the first three sections, each challenge is designed to introduce users to a key feature and have them edit a sample document using that feature. The quick points section doesn’t offer specific challenges, but lists features instead, which can be used outside the game to accumulate points. Half of all available points can be earned through the game challenges offered in the first three sections, while the remaining points must be earned from implementing the same features outside of the game.

Microsoft has taken great care in designing the challenges by creating short, relevant tasks and providing immediate feedback and reinforcement to help keep the user engaged and interested. Also, by keeping the the difficulty level manageable, yet challenging, and providing enough support to insure reasonable success, the game encourages further play and development of Office skills.

Another feature of Ribbon Hero is it’s ability to track the progress of the user in learning to use the Office features and tools, and adjust the challenges accordingly. Not only by following the game progress, but by monitoring the features used outside of the game. The game can then adjust the order of training content to ensure that users see only features and tools that they haven’t seen before.

Because Ribbon Hero can link to Facebook, each player can share their scores and compare their progress with friends on Facebook who also play the game. In essence, Ribbon Hero is a software tutorial within a game that can be socially connected. This is one of the best corporate education gamification examples out there.

Note: Ribbon Hero was followed by the sequel, Ribbon Hero 2: Clippy’s Second Chance. This sequel adds a time travel element to the original game, where the user can follow the in game hero, Clippy, into different periods in time. The featured periods are Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the 1960’s, and the future. In each case there are several Office-based tasks that must be completed before a move to the next period can be made.

 

Continue reading Gamification in Education: Top 10 Gamification Case Studies that will Change our Future

A Comprehensive List of 90+ Gamification Cases with ROI Stats

Gamification-Stats-and-Figures

It’s all about the Gamification Case Study

Below are a list of gamification cases with ROI stats and figures, with links to the case studies, so you can see for yourself the huge impact it is causing on businesses.

Many of these examples and lists can be seen on other websites such as the Enterprise Gamification Consultancy and Barnraisers, which are great sites, but I wanted to make this list only focus on cases that have pure numbers or %s that can be measured as ROI.

Enterprise Gamification Case Stats and Figures

  1. SAP: The SAP Community Network regamified its already-mature reputation system, increasing usage by 400% and community feedback by 96%
  2. SAP Streamwork: added gamification in brainstorming groups and grew generated ideas by 58%
  3. Onmicare: introduces gamification to its IT service desk, getting a 100% participation rate from teams members
  4. Astra Zeneca: gamified medicine training gets 97% of their large network of agents to participate, with a 99% Completion Rate
  5. CaLLogix: reduces attrition by 50% and absenteeism by 80%. The company saves $380,000 per year
  6. Slalom Consulting: participation of employee name recognition program increased from 5% to 90%, and recognition scores improved from 45% to 89%
  7. Galderma: pharmaceutical company, uses gamification to train their sales division regarding new products. Despite the voluntary participation, nearly 92% of targeted employees ended up playing
  8. Spotify and Living Social: replaced annual reviews with a mobile, gamified solution with over 90% of employees participating voluntarily
  9. Objective Logistics: the company motivates the employees through behavioral rewards and increases their profit margin by 40%
  10. Inside View: gamifies their employee social media usage and increased Twitter updates by 312%
  11. Keas: employment wellness program that increased employee engagement with healthy activities by 10,000% (100x)
  12. Danske Statsbaner: through their “Engaged” platform, employees share their actions that support the value and strategy of the company, resulting in 92% positive ratings in content
  13. Google: designed a Travel Expense System resulting in close to 100% of employee compliance for travel expenses
  14. Deloitte: training programs that are gamified took 50% less time to complete and massively improved longterm engagement
  15. Engine Yard: increased the response rate for its customer service representatives by 40% after posting response-time leaders to all employees
  16. Nextjump: uses gamification to get 67% of their employees to go to the gym
  17. Bluewolf: gamified online conversations and posting increased employee community activity by 57%
  18. Ford Canada: gamified it’s learning portal for employees and increased actions per user by 100% within 5 weeks
  19. Blueshield’s Wellivolution: Team gamified system resulted in 80% of employees participating in at least one wellness program, and 50% of employees dropped smoking behavioral
  20. Idea Street: the Department of work In UK used game mechanics to get 120,000 people to contribute 4000 ideas, with 63 of them implemented in the marketing department
  21. EMC RAMP: with their gamification platform, the company rewarded positive behavior from employees, partners and customers which led to a 10% increase in documentation, 40% more videos watched and 15% more discussions
  22. DirecTV: uses gamification to overcome the fear of failure
  23. HCL: decrease new hire “Pre Join” drop out rate by 90%
  24. T-Mobile: dials up employee engagement by 1,000 percent

 Sales Gamification Case Stats and Figures

  1. Autodesk: gamified the free trial, incentivizing users to learn how to use the program and offering both in game and real word prizes, increasing trial usage by 54%, buy clicks by 15% and channel revenue by 29%
  2. ePrize: increased the participation in their sales event by 10% by creating a participation-based point economy 
  3. LiveOps: call center reduces call time by 15% and increases sales by over 8%
  4. Step2: children’s retailer used PowerReview’s social loyalty scheme to boost up sales with a 300% increase in revenue from Facebook and 600% in contents uploaded
  5. Domino’s Pizza: created the gaming app Pizza Hero and increased sales revenue by 30% by letting customers create their own pizza with an app
  6. Moosejaw, clothing company, that used an innovative gamified system that saw 76% of sales revenue come from gamified activities, including 240k social media impressions, resulting in a 560% ROI from initial marketing expenditures
  7. Silver Grill Cafe: received a 66% Return on Investment for having its waiters/waitresses play a cross-selling game
  8. Cisco: used gaming strategies to enhance its virtual global sales meeting and call centers to reduce call time by 15% and improved sales by around 10%
  9. Popchips: uses games to personalize mobile advertising and has seen its sales rise 40% leading to $100 million in sales.
  10. Teleflora gamified its store with a social engagement scheme offering points for actions, increasing traffic from facebook by 105% and conversion rates by 92%
  11. America’s Army: 30% of americans age to 16 to 24 had a more positive impression towards and has recruited more people than all the other methods combined while costing a fraction of the marketing cost
  12. Extraco Bank: raised customer acquisition by 700% through gamified system
  13. Lawley Insurance: with a 2-week contest, the company closed more sales than the previous 7 months combined
  14. Playboy: in its Miss Social game, 85% of their users play more than once, with 50% returning a month later, resulting in a 60% increase in monthly revenue
  15. Kill The Paper Invoice: increased website visits by 108.5%, and a conversion rate of 9.38% through a gamfiied system
  16. Sneakpeeq.com: increased their conversion rate by 18% with a 3000% lift in total numer of click-per-buy
  17. Ford Escape Route: with this game, Ford’s customers bought over $8 million in vehicles, with 600% increased likes on FB page, and over 100 million impressions on Twitter
  18. Investorville: with a property-investing game, Australia’s Commonwealth Bank created 600 new loans
  19. Hewlett Packard: launched Project Everest to give rewards like holidays and other goods to the best reseller teams and saw a 56.4%.

Product Gamification Case Stats and Figures

  1. Microsoft: improved it’s translations for Windows OS through the Language Quality game with over 900 employees completing 26,000 tasks with 170 additional errors reported
  2. Leadership Academy: within three months, daily visitors increased by 46.6% with one user earning the Leadership Academy Graduate Badge, which was expected to take 12 months
  3. Microsoft: obtained 16x more feedback by people through its Communicate Hope gamified system
  4. EMC2: increased the amount of feedback it received by 41%
  5. Dosomething.org:  got a 26% response rate from teen audience to a scavenger hunt game
  6. OpenText: implementation of a leaderboard contributed to a 250% increase in business usage and adoption
  7. Volkswagen: got 33 million webpage hits and 119,000 ideas through its People’s Car Project that lets people design their “perfect car”
  8. Samsung Nation: 500% increase in customer product reviews, and 66% increase in site’s visits when using a gamified system
  9. Beta One: Microsoft’s Testing Division get a 400% increase in participation for the pre-release testing

Lifestyle Gamification Case Stats and Figures

  1. OPower: reduced measurable energy consumption by over $100M
  2. Aetna: increased daily healthy activities by 50% with an average engagement of 14 minutes on the site
  3. ClinicalAdvisor.com: embedded a social platform that improved user submission by 300%, comments by 400%, and Slideshow Visualizations by 53%
  4. Bottle Bank Arcade: gamified bottle bank was used 50 times more than conventional bottle bank.
  5. The World’s Deepest Bin: 132% more trash collected compared to conventional bin
  6. Piano Stairs: 66% more of people use the stairs, if they can produce music with it
  7. Speed Camera Lottery: a lottery system that causes a 22% reduction of driving speed
  8. Toilette Seat: 44% of increase in lifting the toilet seat when urinating
  9. Nike: used gamified feedback to drive over 5,000,000 users to beat their personal fitness goals every day of the year
  10. Recycle Bank grew a community of 4 million members by providing a gamified recycling platform.
  11. Chevrolet Volt: uses a green/amber indicator to give drivers visual feedback of their driving style and reduced the number of people exceeding the speed limit by 53%

Consumer Behavior Gamification Case Stats and Figures

  1. MTV My Chart: lets users create their video chart based on various game dynamics, and obtained 500,000 votes and 150,000 videos viewed within 3 months
  2. Joiz: a Swiss television network increased sharing by 100% and social referral traffic by 54% with social infrastructure and gamification technologies
  3. Muchmusic.com: increased their music userbase by 59%
  4. Marketo: layered a game platform on their community and saw a 71% lift in daily activities, 36% increase in ideas submitted and 48% increase in question replies.
  5. Interscope Records: the company obtained a 650% increase in engagement and interaction with the website
  6. Verizon: users spend over 30% more time on-site with social login games versus a regular site login
  7. Allkpop: during the week long promotion of game mechanics, the online news site experienced a 104% increase in shares, 36% in comments, and 24% in pageviews.
  8. SessionM: offers mobile publishers a platform for adding game mechanics into apps, increasing 35% in retention and reduced bounce rate by 25%, all while seeing 40x increase in engagement rate in social activities
  9. Buffalo Wild Wings: the campaign generated more than 100 million social impressions on SN, as well as a 500% increase in participation rate
  10. Green Giant: generated 420,000 likes on Facebook through their gamified system
  11. NickTV: introduces a game-based role-playing platform as heroes and within 2 months obtained 750,000 pages views (200% the amount of the usual traffic for the entire nicktv.it website), over 50,000 users and over 4,000,000 sessions on the website, with an increase in time spent on site by 25%
  12. More than a Game: The interviewer changed the formulation of surveys, obtaining a 98% response rate and a 87.5% in descriptive words within answers
  13. BlurbIQ: introduced Interactive Video Interruptions and within two weeks obtained 915% more interaction, 1400% increase in click through rate and 95% increase in recollection
  14. Bell Media: increased customer retention by 33% by incorporating “social loyalty” rewards on its website
  15. Club Psych USA: saw a 130% jump in page views and a 40% increase in return visits towards the game 
  16. American Express: the company has gotten over 2 millions likes on Facebook through their Nextpedition gamified system
  17. Boyd Game: the casino gets over 700,000 visits each month by introducing gamification on its website
  18. Verizon Wireless: more than 50% of site’s user participate in this gamified environment and spend 30% more time on the site
  19. Topliners: introducing the gamification in the community lifted active users by 55%
  20. SAP ERP: introducing game mechanics improved user participation with telepresence increasing by 29.75%
  21. GetGlue: Has build a community of 2 million users around a gamified t.v. feedback platform, 20% of all social media posts to dedicated t.v. show pages during primetime come through GetGlue. (Link in Italian)
  22. Ask.com uses game mechanics to increase user engagement through real-time notifications and activity streams, increasing answered questions by 23% and votes by 58%
  23. MuchMusic.com implemented a social loyalty program, rewarding users with tangible gifts such as concert tickets and led to weekly activity increase by 59%
  24. Badgeville & Kendall-Jackson: increase customer engagement by 65%
  25. Patient Partner: uses gamification to improve medication adherence

Education Gamification Case Stats and Figures

  1. Beat the GMAT: students increase their time spent on site by 370% through a gamified system
  2. OTT, an e-learning provider, increased by 65% user engagement, with some users peaking at over 300%, by adding a reward system
  3. Deloitte Leadership Academy, an executive training program, increased by 46.6% the number of users that returned daily to their platform by embedding gamification mechanics into it
  4. Stray Boots & A.L.Penenberg: the professor taught journalism through gamification and saw student grades increase by more than a letter grade
  5. Devhub: a place for Web developers, added gaming feedback and watched in awe as the percentage of users who finished their sites shot up from 10% to 80%
  6. Foldit: gamers have solved a 15-Year AIDS Virus Protein problem within 10 days

Scientific research related to the effect of Gamification

  1. Research findings support the impact of levels, badges and a (dummy) feedback system connected to a study course, results were significant, with 18.5% higher average grade for students enrolled in the gamified course. 
  2. Research findings support the impact of levels, points, leaderboards, streaking and visual storytelling to improve participation in crowdsourced assessments. Results were significant with an increase of 347% of participants returning for recurrent participation. (compared to control group)
  3. Research findings support the impact of point based levels (Status titles) and leaderboards to IBM’s internal social network service. Short term impact showed 92% increase in comments posted, within this research long term engagement was also measured and  an increase of 299% more comments posted was found compared to the control group. 
  4. A subsequent research in the same social network service above showed the effects of removing the point based levels, status titles and leaderboards. The removal of the game mechanics showed a significant result as across the board activities on the social network service dropped by 52%. 
  5. Research findings support the impact of narrative, leaderboards and countdown timers to an online training. Results were significant with a 61% increase in participation for an online training.
  6. Research findings support the impact of narrative, levels, quests, countdown timers, immediate feedback, guidance systems, visual story telling, surprise events and flow (matching ability and difficulty) to an online tutorial. Results were significant with users learning via the gamified tutorial showing increased ability by finishing tasks 135% faster compared to the control group. Additionally the users expressed much higher satisfaction in regards to using the system.

For a more detailed approach to gamification and human-focused design, try Octalysis Prime, the gamified mentorship journey.