6 Octalysis Prime Members in Guru Top 100

Every  month, Rise Global calculates and publishes the Top Gamification Gurus. See full list here. https://www.rise.global/gurus/r/2555721

Exciting news! 9 members of Octalysis Prime made the Top 100,  with Yu-kai taking #1.

Members include Ercan Altug Yilmaz, An Coppens, Rob Alvarez Bucholska, Joris Beerda, Sabrina Bruehwiler, Albert Van Der Meer, Tiago Marinho Sizenando, and Mike Finney!

This news comes just after the news of Yu-kai’s strong performance in the UK Gamification conference, where he was voted #1 Gamification Guru by his peers.

 

How to Digital Declutter with Octalysis Gamification, Part 1 of 8: Letting Go of Ownership

Post written by Erik van Mechelen, inspired by Yu-kai Chou’s Octalysis framework.

Decluttering your life isn’t easy, but it doesn’t have to be so hard. The power of applying Octalysis to your lifestyle improvements will be showcased today by example of digital decluttering. This article is as a complement to the previous series on lifestyle gamification.

Unless you are comfortable with creative chaos (I occasionally am), you probably could benefit from a small or large digital declutter.

Let’s get your life decluttered.

Continue reading How to Digital Declutter with Octalysis Gamification, Part 1 of 8: Letting Go of Ownership

Octalysis Budapest: Gamification and Behavior Design Workshop–Budapest, Hungary, April 13-15 2018

Octalysis Gamification Workshop

Yu-kai Chou was recently voted by his peers at the Gamification UK conference as Gamification Guru of the Year for 2017.

Yu-kai loves sharing knowledge about human-focused design encapsulated by the 8 Core Drives of Octalysis and helping experience designers use the Octalysis Strategy Dashboard, Power-Ease Feature List, and Battleplan to manage, design, and implement motivational design projects.

Another workshop is scheduled for spring of 2018 in Hungary! This workshop will once again share the outlines of  Octalysis before going into detail of applying Octalysis to workshop attendee projects.

Learn more about the Octalysis Gamification Workshop presented by Yu-kai Chou in Budapest, Hungary: http://octalysis-budapest.com/en/255-2/

Important Event Details

Date: 14-15 April 2018 (for VIP ticketholders, events begin  on April 13!

Early bird pricing  ends February 28, 2018

Venue: Lurdy Conference Center

Topic: Octalysis Gamification

Reserve your tickets now.

4 Experience Phases in Gamification (#4): The Endgame

Endgame Design

Endgame: The Final Phase for Experience Design

The Endgame is the 4th and final experience phase of Octalysis Gamification. The Endgame is all about how you retain your veterans and obtain more longevity in your experience.

This is the phase where users have done everything there is to do at least once (according to their perception), and they are figuring out why should they stick around and continue to play the game (especially when there are newer more exciting alternatives out there).

Many have said that, in World of Warcraft, the real game starts when your character has reached the max level. This is not intuitive for non-gamers, because the basic assumption is that once you reach the max level, there is nowhere to go. In the case of well designed games, that actually is the beginning of a multi-year journey.

Unfortunately, not many companies design for the Endgame, which I believe is a huge mistake. Your veterans are usually your best monetization vehicles, your best community moderators, and also your best evangelists.

The problem is that they have been there as long as they can remember, so why should they still continue to stay on board? Have you designed anything that specifically keeps them engaged and motivated?

The game-term Endgame

Often times there is a misunderstanding towards the term “Endgame.”

Some people think that this means the game is about to end, and ask, “What about games that are meant to last forever such as infinite games?”

In reality, in the gaming world the term Endgame is not where the game ends. The Endgame is where a user has reached the highest level and is transitioning from the basic day-to-day scaffolding mechanics to a new set of mechanics that only advanced level players can infinitely do.

The Endgame is about endless fun

In Plants Vs Zombies, once you finish all the levels twice, the Endgame is about custom challenges that you can unlock and conquer. In the Diablo series, it’s “Diablo Runs” where players band together to defeat the final boss multiple times a day in order to get enough loot to perfect their gear. In FarmVille, it might be using all your gold and plants to create masterful artwork and take a screenshot before they all wither out.

Gamers would sometimes complain in many games that the game developers need to do more work because there’s really nothing to do in the Endgame, which means they have done everything but long for more. Some games may have the general journey (Scaffolding) of striving towards the max level, and the endgame lies in player versus player battles, or Group Quests of Max Level Players taking on extremely difficult challenges.

Differences to other Models

My terminology is also different from other gamification professionals’ last phase of a player’s journey. Kevin Werbach and Amy Jo Kim call the final phase of the journey “Mastery,” as the player has now achieved the highest level of play.

While I think the phrase Mastery is accurate, I believe that the term “Mastery” creates a feeling that it is actually the end of the journey – you have achieved mastery and are looking for something else to master now. With “Endgame,” it is still a “game” you play and try to master. It suggests that the journey keeps going.

So let’s examine how the endgame can be more engaging based on the 8 Core Drives of Octalysis

Core Drive 1: Epic meaning and Calling in the Endgame

During the end game it becomes much more difficult to install more Epic Meaning and Calling into the process. Continue reading 4 Experience Phases in Gamification (#4): The Endgame