Octalysis – complete Gamification framework

This post is a high-level introduction to Octalysis, the Gamification Framework I created after more than 10 years of Gamification research and study. Within a year of publication, Octalysis was organically translated into 9 languages and became required literature in Gamfication instruction worldwide.

Click the “Continue reading –>” link below to learn about Octalysis.

Continue reading Octalysis – complete Gamification framework

Time Well Spent, Class Craft, and Blizzard: Gamification Examples April Week 3

Based on the framework by Yu-kai Chou. Written by Erik van Mechelen. Feedback from Octalysis Prime community members. 

Every day in Octalysis Prime, I share a game or gamification example that has captured my attention or persuaded me to do something, whether to simply spend a few seconds longer of attention or to click something or to later mention what I saw or experienced to a friend.

This list is the just a few from last week, with a touch more in detail explanations from the Octalysis design perspective.

Brain hacking and Time Well Spent

This is from the homepage of Time Well Spent, created by a team looking for better ways of tracking app and website and product success versus the current tradition of time-on-site or daily actives.

This homepage uses Core Drive 7: Unpredictability & Curiosity to great effect through typed messages that disappear, continuing the message. You have to wait to see the next message, and it is worth it. It closes with a call to action.

Here’s more if you’re interested. Link to article.

ClassCraft

ClassCraft utilizes all 8 of the Core Drives:

Core Drive 1: Epic Meaning & Calling:  Imagine learning is an epic adventure!
Core Drive 2: Development & Accomplishment:  Leveling up!
Core Drive 3: Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback:  Customizing your character.
Core Drive 4: Ownership & Possession:  Customizing your character.
Core Drive 5: Social Influence & Relatedness:  Team quests.
Core Drive 6: Scarcity & Impatience:  Waiting for energy or the next quest.
Core Drive 7: Unpredictability & Curiosity:  Random events.
Core Drive 8: Loss & Avoidance:  Losing your streaks 🙂

From Judit, Octalysis Prime member and 20-year teacher in Hungary:

All of the 8 CDs can be found in ClassCraft. And it’s good to know, as you can use the elements more confidently, and can find a good balance. I’ve found that if I use ClassCraft on the basis of Octalysis, it’s comfortable for me and effective for my students!

Apple Watch Earthday

Classic case of a social influencer using a social prod combined with a mini-quest and a badge to top it off!

Game techniques used:

Influencer

Social Prod

Mini-quest

Badging

Apple’hardcorere fans will probably talk about this, leading to increased word-of-mouth effects (CD5).

Blizzard, tweaking designs of others

Blizzard is a well-known game design and video game company. Well, pretty well known 🙂

Their games have accessibility and well-balanced designs.

Here’s a comment from Bo P. U.

Bo P. U. [3:58 AM]
Also, a more general example: The PC game company Blizzard has a huge focus on proper design.

They never do anything truly original, but have a strategy of “fixing the design mistakes of others”.

Blizzard is known for taking a long time to get games right, but it is worth it. Bo goes on to say:

Try to compare any Blizzard game to the original concept: Heroes of the Storm to DOTA (or LoL) or Hearthstone to Magic the Gathering.

In these examples the difference in accessibility for new players is huge.
So Blizzard can be used as a gold standard if they made a design choice it’s probably the right one.

Keep your eyes open for gamification

If you want to share…please do in the comments, or in the Octalysis Prime Slack community itself!

To join the community, you’ll have to be a member of Octalysis Prime.

These gamification examples are brought to you by the community of Octalysis Prime.

 

Gamification Examples: Slow Game Jams and Epic Hyperloop

Based on the framework by Yu-kai Chou. Written by Erik van Mechelen.

Every day in Octalysis Prime, I share a game or gamification example that has captured my attention or persuaded me to do something, whether to simply spend a few seconds longer of attention or to click something or to later mention what I saw or experienced to a friend.

This list is the just a few from last week, with a touch more in detail explanations from the Octalysis design perspective.

Khan Academy – Free for everyone forever

We’ve written about Khan Academy before. And here (lifelong learners) and here, too (saving the world).

In this example, I’m just looking at the homepage of Khan Academy as of April 2017.

Notice the epic meaning and calling, as well as the ownership.

You get to learn forever, for free.

You don’t have to worry about losing progress or switching later. Khan academy will always be there are for you.

Also, notice the lack of Black Hat core drives. If something will be great forever, it need not play to urgency or scarcity. Khan Academy probably loses some people here, “Oh, i can come back later…”, but it also gets a lot of people to consider longer-lasting experiences or journies with them.

Amazon’s Home-like Home Screen

Here’s my homepage on desktop. Wow, there’s a few things happening here. Something for everyone?

But wait, the page is personalized with the Alfred Effect (Game Technique #84) just for my personal needs and future desires through recommendations.

Notice the “Hi, Erik” messaging, and ‘Related to items you’ve viewd’ links, for even more Core Drive 4.

Slow Game Jam aims to fuel creativity by canning crunch

Slowing down for a game jam? Doing hard creative work while impeded by a deadline can detract from the quality.

But a slower game jam looks to unfreeze creators.

Games are an art form, and art requires work. But art also requires rest, just like any kind of work. It requires problem-solving, attention, and space, breaks, rests, and revision.

Through Core Drive 3: Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback, this game jam gives creators and game designers feedback space to create.

The Hyper Loop?

We’ve previously written about persuasion (in the US presidential elections). There was one different kind of proposal when the designs began coming in for the wall, which focused on community and sustainability. Inspiring prosperity and community.

The network would also feature several solar farms, which would power the hyperloop. The designers say an equal number of Americans and Mexicans would build the system.

Here we see a combination of Core Drive 1: Epic Meaning & Calling and Core Drive 5: Social Influence & Relatedness.

Until next week, keep your eyes open for gamification designs.

These gamification examples are brought to you by the community of Octalysis Prime.

How to Design Games to Make Yourself More Social

This article was written by Erik van Mechelen based on a conversation between Octalysis Prime member Russell Lee and Yu-kai Chou about how to design personal games for the practice of being more social. 

Developing a Practice of Being More Social

In our most recent Octalysis Prime Brief (a place to chat for Octalysis Prime members once every two weeks), member Russell Lee asked about how to use gamification principles to be more social.

Even though he waited until the last 5 minutes of the one-hour session to ask the question, Yu-kai had a great conversation with him. It’s something we might all learn from, especially those of us a bit shy or lazy or fearful in social settings.

This post aims to capture those ideas and principles.

Get over the fear of engaging in conversations with strangers

Let’s imagine you wanted to get over the fear of engaging in conversations with strangers. This would help you

  • network at business events,
  • talk to new people at parties, and
  • make the most of chance encounters with people in grocery stores or people you see in a 30-second elevator ride.

Remember, it’s natural to feel some fear.

In Actionable GamificationYu-kai shared (audiobook) that is his experience moving back to Taiwan at a young age (from South Africa) meant he was behind his peers in learning Chinese. This put him at a disadvantage socially, too.

Later, though, he was voted into and took on the role of chess club president and elevated his confidence. You could have a similar transformation.

If you want the above goal, consider the game of getting over your fear of these conversations as your game or business metrics (in the language of the Octalysis Strategy dashboard).

To begin, let’s take the example of a business networking event.

Your desired action could simply be to get people to talk to you. Count every sentence spoken (by the other person) as the desired action. To continue the exchange, reward the person with whom you’re speaking with a compliment.

This feeling of being listened to is a reward and sometimes triggers the next desired action: that person speaking another sentence and sharing a little more. Your response to their next statement, usually with a question or a “tell me more” prompt continues it further.

Strangely, the more someone says to you or shares with you, the more they will trust you. And trust is good for future conversation and relationships.

Do this as long as you can to continue the conversation. Your response to their next statement, usually with a question or comment, might trigger the next desired action.

Don’t worry too much if the conversation isn’t that interesting. You can always level up to a game where you will kindly leave conversations that aren’t interesting.

This is why it’s very important to define these desired actions. Start small and level up later.

As another example: in the case of talking to people at parties, you might create a bingo game of rejections (or short conversations) as a way to strive for more rejections. More rejections mean you will complete your bingo game give you more practice in engaging with people in this setting (the business metric). And by “failing” through rejection, you can still feel great about the practice and completion of your game.

You could have zero good conversations at a party but gain incredible practice.

Some tips to make conversation:

  1. have confidence
  2. radiate enthusiasm and energy (genuinely)
  3. help others feel good (CD5)

From a content perspective:

  1. Add relevant comments to show you are listening (“this part of what you said was interesting, tell me more about that”)
  2. Give relatable feedback (“my friend had the same thing happen, that’s amazing you made it through that difficult time”)
  3. Ask follow-up questions (“how’d you accomplish that?”)

Be brief. When you ask a question, let the other person respond 🙂

This should get you thinking.

Reply to this email (or on the Octalysis Explorers Facebook group) to share what social settings are challenging you. What game could you create to improve your interactions?

Top College Degrees that will Help you Get a Career in Gamification

This article is written by Erik van Mechelen, based on the Octalysis gamification framework developed by Yu-kai Chou.

Choosing a college degree to learn gamification

Approaching university and trying to figure out what courses, or better yet, what degrees to spend your valuable time and money achieving? In this article, we’ll try to dig deeper into what areas in your university system may be a good place to visit and stay awhile.

Remember, degrees aren’t necessarily synonymous with skills. Throughout college, I did side projects to follow my curiosity and learn new skills.

As is becoming more and more the case (hasn’t it always been the case?), employers or heads of teams or startups want to know if you can do the job or not, and if you have the ability to continue growing and learning within the role.

My guess is this holds true for gamification roles, too.

Now, let’s quickly jump over a mental hurdle you may be experiencing. On the surface, gamification-specific jobs might seem rare. If you search major job sites you won’t see many job titles with gamification, but some descriptions are starting to include our favorite keyword.

Regardless of what you call it, we know human-focused design is part of many roles. In this article about roles gaining an edge from gamification knowledge, I discussed how product designers, UI/UX designers, and product managers use gamification to their advantage every day.

For this article, I’ll consider traditional university degrees that might best prepare you for roles where gamification knowledge gives you an edge.

Remember, getting a gamification job doesn’t require a degree, and your foot in the door may simply be the quality of your portfolio and hustle.

Continue reading Top College Degrees that will Help you Get a Career in Gamification

How Understanding Gamification Gives an Edge in Design and Product Roles

This article was written by Erik van Mechelen, based on the Octalysis Gamification framework designed by Yu-kai Chou. 

Getting an edge with gamification

Can you get a job in gamification?

At first glance, the pickings are slim. An Indeed job search for ‘gamification’ doesn’t return many results, but does include roles with gamification mentioned in the description, from VR software developers to instructional designers to sales specialists and customer care reps.

We do know there are jobs in gamification. (The Octalysis Group recently did a contest posted on their Octalysis Explorers Facebook page, with a contest to demonstrate gamification knowledge and potentially join The Octalysis Group.)

But it isn’t the only option.

From getting to know many people, and some people quite well, in the Octalysis Explorers and Octalysis Prime Mastermind group, I know there is a huge variety of people and professional roles that understand gamification knowledge (and understanding how to apply that knowledge in their roles) will give them an edge in their daily professional activities.

When considering gamification, the closest job postings might be for:

1. Product Designer
2. UX Designer
3. Product Manager

A thorough understanding of gamification could give you an edge in these roles.

Just like people used to say developers who knew AJAX got paid 15% higher than developers who don’t, gamification may become your edge to higher pay and better performance.

Continue reading How Understanding Gamification Gives an Edge in Design and Product Roles